Friday, August 21, 2009

Obesity and Libido

Fat cells inhibit the release of hormones that promote libido sensitivity. The hypothalamus controls the release of corticotropin releasing hormone. When released CRH activates the pituitary gland which then releases adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH). ACTH travels to the adrenal glands and activates the release of Cortisol. Cortisol is a stress hormone that inhibits cell metabolism. When cortisol is high in the system it inhibits the uptake of cholesterol to enter in the cells. The reproductive organs of the female and the testis of the man do not get the required cholesterol to help boost the testosterone effects needed to promote a healthy sex drive. In fact, estrogen and progesterone levels drop for the female. This can cause a loss of menstrual regularity and can influence the risk of developing disease or cancer. For men the low level of testosterone can influence a higher level of estrogen. Over time this can promote dysfunction of the prostrate and can cause cancer. Cholesterol is necessary for proper functioning of the sexual organs and physiological systems. Also, with high levels of cortisol in the system chances are that serotonin levels are low. Serotonin is the "Happy Hormone" that helps regulate the central nervous system. When there is a low level of serotonin in the body then the central nervous system is depressed. Depression will also cause a release of cortisol. Many obese people suffer from central nervous depression. Cortisol inhibits fat metabolism increasing size and number of fat cells. It is a viscous cycle that tends to perpetuate as long as a person adheres to endocrine limiting factors such as; eating sugars, alcohols, trans fats, being stressed, depressed, anxious, not eating enough healthy fat and cholesterol. Overall, a person who is suffering from a low libido is most likely setting off a cascade of hormonal sequences that force inhibition of the reproductive organs. The more fat cells a person obtains the lesser the desire to have sex. This can all be reversed by reducing the increase in fat cells and nourishing the body to help keep cortisol stabilized.

If you are interested in learning more about this and many other topics on nutrition and health please email me your name and I will keep you posted on the release of my new book "Diet Earth: Complete Nutrition For The Human Species.


tags: obesity, nutrition, weight loss, exercise, fitness, steroids, health, diet

2 comments:

  1. Low libido has become an ever-increasing issue in today's modern world as life seems harder and we all seem to be working more than ever before. Many of us have come to accept this as a fact of life and have ignored the need for sexual pleasure within our lives and really pushed sex to the back burner.

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